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The English Language Arts (ELA) standards insist that instruction in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language be a shared responsibility within the school. The grades 6–12 standards are divided into two sections, one for ELA and the other for history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. This interdisciplinary approach to literacy is based on research indicating that students who are college and career ready must be proficient in reading complex text from many disciplines. To support this, the Common Core Sstandards for ELA:

  • Have more of a focus on increasing the complexity of the texts students read and discuss, and developing skills in argumentative writing and research.
  • Emphasize speaking and listening skills as an avenue to evaluate, integrate and present information from many sources.
  • Call for increased use of technology/multi-media to gather and publish information.

– Reading standards

  • Introduce reading material of increasing complexity and require the progressive development of reading comprehension.
  • Mandate certain critical types of content for all students, including classic myths and stories from around the world, foundational U.S. documents, seminal works of American literature, and the writings of Shakespeare.
  • Propose that students read a diverse array of classic and contemporary literature as well as challenging informational texts in a range of subjects. The standards include sample texts to illustrate the expectations, but leave curriculum decisions other than the mandated content above to states, districts, and schools students.

– Writing standards

  • Prepare students to write logical arguments based on substantive claims, sound reasoning, and relevant evidence, including at the early grades.
  • Require research—both short, focused projects (such as those commonly required in the workplace) and longer term in depth research.
  • Provide annotated samples of student writing and help establish adequate performance levels in writing arguments, informational/explanatory texts, and narratives in the various grades.

– Speaking and Listening standards

  • Require that students gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence through listening and speaking as well as through media.
  • Call for formal and informal presentations, including academic discussion in one-on-one, small-group, and whole-class settings.

– Language standards

  • Expect that students will grow their vocabularies through a mix of conversations, direct instruction, and reading. The standards will help students determine word meanings, appreciate the nuances of words, and steadily expand their repertoire of words and phrases.
  • Recognize that students must be able to use formal English in their writing and speaking but that they must also be able to make informed, skillful choices among the many ways to express themselves through language.
  • Include strands for vocabulary and conventions, not because skills in these areas should be handled in isolation but because their use extends across reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

 

Staff

Ms. Campbell

Ms. Cushman

Ms. Gribble

Ms. Ericksen

Ms. Nelson

Ms. Poortinga

Mr. McAuliffe

Mr. Miltenberger

Ms. Prichard

Ms. Thorsen

Ms. Wilhelm

 

To Kill a Mockingbird/ Literary Analysis

Persuasive Research Essay

Publishing Guidelines

English  Courses
Literary materials were selected based on the identified outcomes for each course. Alternative materials that meet those outcomes are available.

9th GRADE PRE-AP ENGLISH

LITERATURE, LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (LLC)

AMERICAN LITERATURE

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE

COLLEGE WRITING

CREATIVE WRITING

POETRY

TECHNICAL WRITING

CONTEMPORARY WORLD LITERATURE

HUMANITIES

NORTHWEST LITERATURE

WORLD LITERATURE/ PHILOSOPHY

SPEECH

AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION