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Inquiry and investigation in all areas of Science: understanding of properties, structures and changes of Earth, function of plants and animals, diversity of organisms and ecology, the study of the material world, energy, waves, light, sound, force, motion, electricity, magnetism and optics.

Systems thinking makes it possible to analyze and understand complex phenomena.Systems concepts begin with the idea of the part-to-whole relationship in the earliest grades, adding the ideas of systems analysis in middle school and emergent properties, unanticipated consequences, and feedback loops in high school.

Inquiry is the bedrock of science and refers to the activities of students in which they develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how the natural world works. Students ask and answer questions that facilitate growth in their understanding of the natural world. Inquiry includes the idea that an investigation refers to a variety of methods that can be used to answer a scientifically oriented question, including: systematic observations, field studies, models and simulations, open-ended explorations, and controlled experiments.

Application includes the ability to use the process of technological design to solve real-world problems, to understand the relationship between science and technology and their influence on society, and to become aware of the wide variety of careers in scientific and technical fields. These abilities are needed for people to apply what they learn in school to meet challenges in their own lives, to understand and help solve societal problems involving science and technology, and contribute to the prosperity of their community, state, and nation.

The Domains of Science focus on nine Big Ideas in the domains of Physical Science, Life Science, and Earth and Space Science that all students should fully understand before they graduate from high school so that they can participate and prosper as citizens in modern society.

Mr. Carlson

Ms. Carpenter

Mr. Chesbrough (on leave)   Mr. Liddle (long-term substitute)

Mr. Doud

Ms. Kruger

Ms. Laas

Ms. Mrosla

Mr. Reinholtz                  Mr. Reinholtz’s Biology site                  Mr. Reinholtz’s Sports Med site

Mr. Roger

 

SCIENCE 
To ensure accurate placement and maximize success, students should consult with their science teacher about course choices for the following semester.Students wishing to enroll in honors science classes should possess a genuine interest in the subject, have “B” or better grades in previous science courses, a history of successful academic habits, and a recommendation from current science teacher.

BIOLOGY

AP (Advanced Placement) BIOLOGY

AP (Advanced Placement) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

CONCEPTUAL CHEMISTRY

QUANTITATIVE CHEMISTRY

AP (Advanced Placement) CHEMISTRY

PHYSICS

AP (Advanced Placement) AP Physics 1:

AP (Advanced Placement) AP Physics 2:

AP (Advanced Placement) AP Physics C:

APPLIED PHYSICS 1 AND APPLIED PHYSICS 2

FORENSICS I

FORENSICS II

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1/2